My favorite game of 2017

horizon zero dawn aloy leap of faith

It’ll be February this week. February! Of 2018!

Not too long ago, I shared my favorite movies of 2017. And about a year ago, I shared my favorite games of 2016. In a normal year, I’d be sharing my favorite games of 2017 right about now.

But, well, that’s not gonna happen. Sorry. Sorry! I’m sorry, sorry.

There are multiple reasons for this. The first one is that I really haven’t played that many games that came out in 2017.

The second reason is that I’ve put a lot of playtime into a few games. I’ve played almost 160 hours of Destiny 2. I put in 50 hours into Mass Effect: Andromeda. Ditto that amount for my favorite game this year. Now that I’m married, I don’t play as many games as I used to. That’s ok. But when three games take up over 260 hours of playtime, that’s a lot of time that could be put into multiple separate games.

The third reason is that I played a lot of games that weren’t released in 2017. I’m not a game journalist, which means that I don’t have an obligation to constantly experience the cutting edge. So if I want to play Rocket League, God bless its beautiful calculated soul, I am going to play Rocket League, or Overwatch Furthermore, I finished the tremendous DLC for Witcher 3 last year, which sunk about 30 hours of my time, and I played another 30 hours of Cities: Skylines, a neat game that I missed when it initially came out. Oh yeah: I’ve also put in another 160 hours into NBA 2k17, which just sort of happened. Sports games are inherently rewarding and easy to return to, and I think are a little underrated in the modern game pantheon.

The fourth reason is that one game I played just blew the rest of them totally out of the water, making a ranking somewhat anticlimactic. At some point in the future, I’ll probably write about my full 2017 list – I have yet to finish Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and I’ve got a few PS4 games like Hellblade and Uncharted: Lost Legacy to play as well. But for now, let’s cut to the chase.

GOLD MEDAL – Horizon Zero Dawn

Aloy horizon zero dawn sunset

My own screenshot, wandering the lands as Aloy

AWWWW YISS.

To begin: Horizon Zero Dawn has no business existing.

First, it’s a single player game. Games nowadays are extraordinarily expensive to make; a standard estimate for a studio’s expense is at $10,000 per head per month. So a team of 100 people working on a game for two years results in a $24 million expense, with no income for the studio until the game is released.  The industry has instead moved towards ‘games as a service.’ These are games that contain an open-ended gameplay loop and an opportunity to utilize microtransactions. Horizon Zero Dawn has an expansive world but nothing beyond replaying it in a new game to keep customers around, its only downloadable content a standard issue expansion pack.

Second, Horizon Zero Dawn features a female protagonist. Yeah, it’s a game in 2017, but that truly matters, and it’s still rare. Look around at the other big releases of the year–Zelda, Mario, Cuphead, Destiny 2, Call of Duty: WWII–none of them feature you, the player, as a female protagonist and character.

horizon zero dawn mountain

Third, and most importantly, Horizon Zero Dawn is a brand new intellectual property. Media, as a whole, has relied more and more on franchises. New franchises are awfully risky, let alone new franchises from somewhat unknown developers. Like I said a few paragraphs ago, games are expensive. To do something new and fresh, something that could fail, and take as many risks as Guerrilla Games did with Horizon is brave.

Horizon Zero Dawn is a video game overflowing with effervescent creativity; it fuses impeccable world-building, satisfying combat, and strong emotional weight to offer an experience that has stuck with me for months. That, I think, is its greatest quality. It is so boldly itself that you can’t help but be gripped by it. Like Aloy, the game is determined and confident in every facet. It is not perfect, but it does not need to be. There are other games which bear facsimiles to this one–open world games with endearing characters, good combat, and interesting narrative hooks. But none of them are Horizon Zero Dawn.

It is a wonder. It should not exist. And yet it does, and its wild success is appropriate and deserved. I love it.

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